Mets Reach Agreement with Ike Davis

The Mets have reportedly reached an agreement with Ike Davis to avoid arbitration, a $3.5 million contract for 2014. Can you believe Davis is still on the team?

ike davis
Get used to seeing this look from Ike Davis in 2014.

Joel Sherman of the New York Post tweeted news of the deal Thursday afternoon. It is less than the $4 million I thought he would get, but still $3.5 million more than Davis actually deserves. It also represents a $375,000 raise over 2013, proving once again that you do not have to do your job well to get a raise these days.

Also today, MLB Trade Rumors reported that the Brewers will sign Mark Reynolds, which probably means they are out of the market for a first baseman. Milwaukee was the most likely landing spot for Davis, and now that appears to be gone.

It looks like Sandy Alderson overplayed his hand as well as overvalued Davis, so now the Mets might be stuck with him. Rival executives reportedly complain about Alderson’s “deliberate” (a kind way to say he is very, very slow) pace in trade talks as he repeatedly weighs the pros and cons of every transaction. It seems like the Brewers just got fed up with him and moved on. I wish the Wilpons would do the same!

In any case, unless something dramatic happens at the 11th hour, Ike Davis will be the Opening Day first baseman. It’s better than Lucas Duda, but it’s still not ideal.

One thought on “Mets Reach Agreement with Ike Davis

  • January 17, 2014 at 6:27 am
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    I still like Ike, and just hope he gets out of his own head. I actually sympathize, as I have been having trouble sleeping lately.

    Why? Because as soon as my head hits the pillow, no matter how tired I am, I start to think of ways in which I can get to sleep. Then I begin to worry about how long it is taking me to fall asleep, and I get uncomfortable in the position I am in. Then, I start to realize that it is far later than it should be for me to get a good night’s sleep, and if I don’t fall asleep soon, I am toast.

    Ike is like this now. When he came up, he ripped the league up. Then he started to overthink. Then he tinkered with his stance. Then he started swinging hard at everything, hoping that if he connected he would at least drive the ball. then he started worrying about getting sent down, and now traded.

    Ike needs to relax and work on making contact. His mistake now is thinking that one homerun replaces three or four hits (one of which COULD be a homerun, with his power).

    No problem with Ike’s D.

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