Retired Uniform Numbers — Which Team Does it Right?

retired numbersWhen the Mets inexplicably named Ricky Henderson a coach during the 2007 season, the team called Willie Mays, to see if he’d mind if Ricky wore his old number 24. Willie said fine, go ahead. My first thought was mild surprise that the Mets never retired Mays’s 24. Mild, because as a lifelong Mets fan, I know how stingy they are in retiring numbers. The only player number the team has retired is Tom Seaver’s 41 (that’s right, no Jerry Koosman (36), Tug McGraw (45), Keith Hernandez (17), or Gary Carter (8)). They’ve even retired a stadium (Shea). But this is Willie Mays for crying out loud. Sure, his season and a half with the Mets were less than distinguished. But a legend wore your uniform, and you don’t deem it worthy of retirement?

I wondered if there was a similar precedent, where a great player returned to his original city to end his career. Of course, we have Hank Aaron. He went back to Milwaukee, winding up his playing days with two seasons of un-Aaron like numbers. But still, the Brewers retired his 44. While these two situations are indeed very similar, there is one glaring difference – Aaron played 12 seasons with the Milwaukee Braves before the team moved to Atlanta. aaron-maysMays played just six seasons with the New York Giants before they moved West. But in those years, he won Rookie of the Year, an MVP award, and a World Series. Doesn’t Mays’ number deserve to hang somewhere in the Big Apple, just as Aaron’s hangs in Milwaukee?

All this talk about retired numbers got me thinking about, well, retired numbers. And luckily the good folks at MLB.com list each team’s retired numbers on their respective websites. I found some things you’d expect, and many, many surprises.

Here’s something obvious – the Yankees have the most retired numbers, 16. That doesn’t include Jackie Robinson, whose 42 is retired by every team. But it does include one number twice (8), for both Yogi Berra and Bill Dickey. And when the Yankees eventually retire Derek Jeter’s 2 and Joe Torre’s 6, the team will have no single digit uniform numbers left to wear!

The Rockies, Marlins, Diamondbacks, Mariners and Blue Jays have no retired player numbers (the Marlins actually retired number 5, in honor of their first team President, Carl Barger). The first four teams make sense, but the Blue Jays? They won back-to-back World Series! Certainly, there are heroes from those teams who deserve to be honored (Joe Carter, anyone?).

Hell, even the Rays have a retired number – Wade Boggs (12), who played just two seasons in Tampa Bay. Oddly, Boston has not retired Boggs’s number, where he played 11 years and collected more than 2000 of his 3010 hits. Perhaps that’s the cost of defecting to the Yankees!

nolan ryanNolan Ryan (left, in best uniform ever!) is the only player to have his number retired by three teams – the Astros and Rangers both retired his 34, while the Angels have laid his 30 to rest.

Just 7 players and one manager have had their numbers retired by two teams. Casey Stengel (37) is the skipper, by the Mets and the Yankees. Rod Carew (29), Angels and Twins; Reggie Jackson, A’s (9) and Yankees (44); Rollie Fingers (34), A’s and Brewers; Carlton Fisk, Red Sox (27) and White Sox (72); Frank Robinson (20), Reds and Orioles; Greg Maddux (31), Cubs and Braves; and the aforementioned Aaron (44), Braves and Brewers, are the players.

Some teams seem too generous in handing out the honor. The Astros are one such club. For a team without much of a history (no World Series titles and just one appearance in the Fall Classic in 46 seasons), they have 9 retired numbers. Compare that to the Tigers, who have been around for 107 years, and have just 5 numbers hanging at Comerica. The Astros apparently take the course of “let’s honor our crowd favorites,” so good, but not great players such as Jimmy Wynn (24), Jose Cruz (25) and Mike Scott (33) are immortalized in team history.

rusty uniThat same strategy must have led the Expos to retire Rusty Staub’s number 10 (left). He played with the club for just 4 years (1969-71, and 1979). But he was the face of the expansion Expos for the first three years of their existence, and that was apparently important enough to retire his number.

The Indians have a rich history, but apparently nothing noteworthy in the last half century. Bob Lemon (21) is the most recent number retiree to play with the Tribe, and his last season was 1958.

On the flipside are the Cardinals. Their 10 retirees span the century, from the 30s, Dizzy Dean (17); the 40s, Enos Slaughter (9); the 50s, Stan Musial (6); the 60s, Bob Gibson (45); the 70s, Lou Brock (20); the 80s, Bruce Sutter (42); and from the 90s, Ozzie Smith (1).

Speaking of Sutter, it doesn’t look like he will join the ranks of dual retirees anytime soon. He played just 4 years with the Cards, and 5 with the Cubs, but he’s wearing a Cardinal hat on his Hall of Fame plaque. And the Cubs are a team that apparently values loyalty above all else. Except for Maddux, Chicago’s retirees — Ron Santo (10), Ryne Sandberg (14), Ernie Banks (23), and Billy Williams (26) — all spent virtually their entire careers in the Windy City.

How about a guy like Steve Garvey? Certainly his number is retired, right? Yes, but not by the Dodgers, where he played for 14 seasons, won an MVP and was a perennial all star. No, Garvey’s number 6 hangs in San Diego, where he played the final 5 years of his career. But he hit what the Padres website calls “the most famous home run in Padres history” that propelled them to their first World Series appearance in 1984. By the way, the retirement-phobic Tigers thrashed the Padres in that series. No members of that Tigers squad have had their numbers retired.

robinsonAs for the Dodgers, they have 10 retired numbers, which is tied for second most. This time that includes Jackie Robinson (42), since he had his number retired long before baseball made its historic decision. That’s a lot, but it still doesn’t seem like enough from a franchise with such a storied history. Where’s Fernando Valenzuela, who electrified all of baseball back in 1981, winning Rookie of the Year and Cy Young? And the infield Garvey anchored with Davey Lopes, Bill Russell and Ron Cey for a record 8 years? And Orel Hershiser and his 60 consecutive scoreless innings? And World Series hero Kirk Gibson?

It just goes to show how each team has its own criteria. One great franchise changing moment may be enough for the Padres, but it’s not enough for the Blue Jays or Dodgers. Some teams only seem to retire the numbers of its players who make the Hall of Fame, like the Orioles, Phillies, Pirates and Red Sox (in fact, according to the team website, that’s official Red Sox policy – elected to the Hall of Fame, and 10 years with the club. Yet still no Boggs. Hmm.). While other teams will retire a player’s number if they had a nice career for them, like a Frank White (20) with the Royals or a Jim Fregosi (11) with the Angels.

So which team does it right? On one hand, it’s kind of depressing to be a Mets fan and have your team basically tell you that you’ve only seen one truly great player wear its uniform. But maybe that’s better than a team which retires the numbers of popular, yet sub par players, giving fans the feeling “that’s the best we’ve ever had?” But only retiring the numbers of Hall of Famers feels a little too exclusive. So I’ll ask again – which team does it right? Damned if I know!

5 thoughts on “Retired Uniform Numbers — Which Team Does it Right?

  • October 9, 2009 at 11:29 am
    Permalink

    lets be honest, it is a disgusting travesty that Boggs # is not retired. Didn’t the yankeees retire Jackson? Of course they did. LIkewise how Toronto could not have retired numbers is insanity. The early 90’s Jays are one of the greatest teams of the last 50 years. ALmost anyone on that team could have a retired number.

    Olerud, ALOMAR, Gruber, Devon WHite, Joe Carter, Henderson, Molitor, Steib, Key, Stewart, Timlin, Henke and Ward. OF that core Carter, Alomar, Steib, Key and Henke certainly deserve to be strongly considered to be honored. Perhaps thats why people in Toronto seem to have forgotten that throughout the 80’s and early 90s their team was consistently excellent.

    Oh year how about George Bell?

  • January 13, 2010 at 10:45 am
    Permalink

    While the Jays do not retire numbers, they do have what they call the “Level of Excellence”. This is where names and numbers (if applicable) of players, coaches, GMs and broadcasters are displayed permanently in the area in front of the 500 level seating. Banners for each are on the 500 level concourse. The names include (in order of addition to the Level):

    George Bell, Dave Stieb, Joe Carter, Cito Caston, Tony Fernandex, Pat Gillick, Tom Cheek and Roberto Alomar.

  • March 31, 2010 at 10:16 am
    Permalink

    The red sox do it well too…
    numbers 1,4,8,9,14,& 27 ARE ALL RED SOX PLAYERS WHO ARE IN
    THE HALL OF FAME, ALL BUT 27 (FISK) ENDED THEIR CAREERS
    WITH THE RED SOX… # 6 IS JOHNNY PESKY, A SPECIAL CASE,
    HE IS SYNOMOUS WITH THE RED SOX HAS BEEN WITH THE RED SOX ORGANIZATION AS A PLAYER , MGR, COACH, EXECUTIVE
    ETC FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE SINCE 1942… BOGGS IS A PUZZLE,
    BUT WHEN HE LEFT IN 92 HE WAS TOLD ‘DON’T LET THE DOOR
    HIT YOU ON THE WAY OUT’.. IF THEY DO FISK, THEY SHOULD DO
    BOGGS…YOU COULD MAKE A CASE FOR JIMMIE FOXX’S # 3 &
    lefty grove’s # 10, but their red sox careers were only 7 & 8 years
    respectively with the red sox. Clemens is the big question, what do they do about him if anything… manny’s # 24 never… he was a piker,
    soon as he found out they wouldn’t give him an extension, he quit
    on them , hence they traded him…. he dogged it too in 2006 when they
    fell out of contention…

  • Pingback:Mets Hall of Fame Omissions » Blogging Mets

  • April 22, 2012 at 10:17 am
    Permalink

    The mets have always played the step-child to the Yankees. The mets have great players whose numbers should be retired…current owners just stink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Why ask?